Vishalakshi Mantap
Vishalakshi Mantap

The Vishalakshi Mantap is the focal point of the ashram, where all the spiritual enthusiasts come together to attend the various courses. This beautifully crafted architectural marvel has been conceived and designed by  His Holiness Sri Sri Ravi Shankar. The Mantap known for its intricate craftsmanship, stunning illumination and elegant décor was built with the dedicated efforts of 7,000 workers and volunteers.

The glass dome that tops the building is adorned with a magnificent ‘kalash’ – 15 feet 3 inches high – the tallest in Asia. Sri Sri has best described the feeling one gets when inside the Mantap as ‘coming in to the lap of the Mother Goddess.’ No one has yet been able to resist falling in love with the Mantap.

Radha Kunj
Radha Kunj
Guru Paduka Vanam
Guru Paduka Vanam

The Guru Paduka Vanam is designed in the shape an open amphi theatre in the shape of a Paduka with a capacity to accommodate two lakh people.

The architecture is based on Vedic Concepts of beautiful gardens (vanam), which provide shelter and nourishment to a seeker on his spiritual journey.

Annapoorna Kitchen and Dining Hall
Annapoorna Kitchen and Dining Hall
The New Dining Facility officially opened in October 2004, in response to the growth of the organization. It is housed in a 3-floor building, each floor has an area of 25,000 sq feet. Whereas the old kitchen catered to 500 people, the New kitchen has the capacity to feed 60,000 people per day. The main dining hall is situated on the ground floor of the building. On a normal day, food is cooked for 20000 people. This includes course/conference participants and ashram residents. The kitchen is run entirely by volunteers, just as the rest of the ashram. The food is prepared by 30-35 full time Sevaks (volunteers). Managing the Kitchen is an enormous task, hence the kitchen follows the policy of Swayam Seva (self help) wherever possible. This practice nurtures a sense of respect for others and self-reliance for the individual. The Food is Satvik and cooked with steam produced from environmentally friendly boilers using fuel called briquettes (a mixture of sawdust, groundnut and coffee shells). Wheat and Bajra flour is ground on the premises in a mill owned and operated by the ashram to cook chapattis (unleavened bread).
On an average day, more than 20000 meals are served. Around 700,000 meals are served per month, and close to 8,400,000 (8.4 million) meals are served every year in the kitchen.
Sumeru Mantap
Sumeru Mantap

The Lotus shaped Sumeru Mantap is a must-see sight for all visitors to the ashram. Geographically located at the highest point in the Ashram, this open air auditorium with an upper balcony yields a breathtaking view of the Ashram grounds and the surrounding areas. With a beautiful water pond at the center, twelve pairs of pillars, representing the twelve signs of the zodiac around it and encircled by ornate lotus petals, the Sumeru Mantap is sheer poetry in architecture. The pillars have been so designed that the first rays of the Sun fall on the pillar with the corresponding zodiac sign carved on the ceiling above it.

Goshala
Goshala

The Goshala means a “place where cows are cared for”. The project’s primary aim is to protect indigenous cows from slaughter and to increase their numbers. Since ages, Man has shared a unique relationship of interdependence with the Cow. In ancient times farmers depended on cows to cultivate farm land, besides which Cows were useful in a variety of ways such as providing milk – a vital food source for the populace. Caring for cows is service to the society. The Goshala also aims to revive the ancient Indian practice of using Cow excretions for useful purposes such as Gowmutra (cow urine), which has medicinal value, and is used as a fertilizer, and Cowdung, which is ideal for promoting cheap chemical free organic farming. This practice has been recently implemented with great success in Vidarbha district of Maharashtra where farmers have been facing heavy debt incurred by the use of artificial chemical fertilizers. Here in the Goshala, every cow is given a name and each morning, divine instrumental music is played to them. This relaxes them and increases their milk production. For anyone interested in sponsoring a cow, the contribution is Rs 50,000. Ancient Indian practice dictated that a family would gift a cow to a priest whenever someone passed away or on the occasion of some important event such as a Yagnya. This practice ensured that the priest had sufficient means to perform his religious rituals such as Pujas and Homa. Here is an opportunity for you to actually donate a cow in memory of your loved ones. The cow is well cared for and the produce is utilized for homa in the ashram as it was meant to be.

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